Disciple of Truth Society

Societies Institute Foundations; We Connect The D.O.T.S.

About

     We are Disciples of Truth…We are Investigative, Historical Researchers…. Philosophers, Theologians, Scientists, and Laymen alike; We are Tsaphah. We are political activists dedicated to unveiling, disseminating, & preserving the Truth…at all cost & risk to our lives. We stand for Freedom; True Freedom for all of humanity. We seek through the past, to better understand 'our' present…& how it will affect our future. We seek for the lost knowledge…& to protect what knowledge we now have. Our Foundation is set upon a single principle:

'There is a Source to all things known & that Source is: The One, The Only, The Omnipotent-Omnipresent-Omniscient Eternal Source of all that has ever been, is, & ever will be. Nameless & Incomprehensible in Its Nature. Limitless by every definition’.

Definitions & Glossary of Terms


3 Great Duties
Masonic Term
The 3 Great Duties are “to God, your neighbor, & yourself.”
Monitor & Officers’ Manual; Grand Lodge of California, F. & A. M. –Adopted 1941; Revised 1944


3 Principle Tenets
Masonic Term
The 3 Principle Tenets are “Brotherly Love, Relief, & Truth.”
Monitor & Officers’ Manual; Grand Lodge of California, F. & A. M. –Adopted 1941; Revised 1944


3 Theological Virtues
Masonic Term
The 3 Theological Virtues are “Faith, Hope, & Charity”
Monitor & Officers’ Manual; Grand Lodge of California, F. & A. M. –Adopted 1941; Revised 1944


4 Cardinal Virtues
Masonic Term
The 4 Cardinal Virtues are “Temperance *****, Fortitude ****, Prudence ******, & Justice ***.”
“Let ***** chasten, **** support & ****** direct you, & let *** be the guide of your actions. Be especially careful to maintain, in their fullest splendor, those truly Masonic ornaments Brotherly Love, Relief, & Truth.”
Monitor & Officers’ Manual; Grand Lodge of California, F. & A. M. –Adopted 1941; Revised 1944


5 Senses
Medical Term used by the Masons & many other Mystery Schools
The 5 Senses are “Hearing, Seeing, Feeling, Smelling, & Tasting.”


5 Orders
Masonic Term
The 5 Orders are “Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, & Composite.”
Monitor & Officers’ Manual; Grand Lodge of California, F. & A. M. –Adopted 1941; Revised 1944
Orders of Architecture. A system of the several members, ornaments, & proportions of columns & pilasters, is called an order. There are five orders of columns, three of which are Greek, the Doric, Ionic, & Corinthian; & two Italian, the Tuscan & the Composite.
Lexicon of Freemasonry; Albert G. Mackey, M.D. 33° –Copyright © T.A. McClure Publishing Co. 1908, 1909, 1910, 1915


7 Liberal Arts
Classical Term adopted by the Masons
The 7 Liberal Arts are “Grammar, Rhetoric, Logic, Arithmetic, Geometry, Music, & Astronomy.”
Monitor & Officers’ Manual; Grand Lodge of California, F. & A. M. –Adopted 1941; Revised 1944
In medieval times, Grammar, Rhetoric, & Logic were the core liberal arts and referred to as Trivium (the thee roads). Mathematics (number in itself), Geometry (number in space), Music-Harmonics-Tuning Theory (Number in time), & Astronomy or Cosmology [which included Astrology](Number in space & time) was referred to as Quadrivium (the four roads). The entire curriculum was referred to as ‘The Seven Liberal Arts’ of the medieval world.


Abstraction
Abstract Thinking
n. Thinking characterized by the ability to use concepts and to make and understand generalizations, such as of the properties or patterns shared by a variety of specific items or events.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
The final, most complex stage in the development of cognitive thinking, in which thought is characterized by adaptability, flexibility, and the use of concepts and generalizations. Problem solving is accomplished by drawing logical conclusions from a set of observations, such as making hypotheses and testing them. This type of thinking is developed by 12 to 15 years of age, usually after some degree of education. In psychiatry, many disorders are characterized by the inability to think abstractly. Compare concrete thinking, syncretic thinking.
Mosby’s Medical Dictionary, 8th edition. © 2009. Elsevier.
Abstract thinking is a concept often compared to concrete thinking, in which thinking is limited to what’s in front of the face, and the here and now. In contrast, the abstract thinker can conceptualize or generalize, understanding that each concept can have multiple meanings. Such thinkers might see patterns beyond the obvious and be able to use patterns or a variety of concrete ideas or clues to solve larger problems. Carl Jung defined some personality types as having the ability to abstractly feel, intuit or sense, in addition to having ability to think. Not all people develop abstract thinking strengths and some people who have previously been strong in this area may lose the facility. People with certain learning disabilities and some types of mental retardation can have great difficulty conceptualizing beyond a certain point or they have trouble with words that represent ideas rather than things. In some instances brain injury, particularly in the frontal lobe, affects a person’s ability to think abstractly, and this may cause difficulties when people need to make conceptual decisions, make moral judgments or problem solve in complex ways. Carl Jung’s definition of abstraction broadened its scope beyond the thinking process to include exactly four mutually exclusive, opposing complimentary psychological functions: sensation, intuition, feeling, and thinking. Together they form a structural totality of the differentiating abstraction process. Abstraction operates in one of these opposing functions when it excludes the simultaneous influence of the other functions and other irrelevancies, such as emotion. Abstraction requires selective use of this structural split of abilities in the psyche. The opposite of abstraction is concretism. Abstraction is one of Jung’s 57 definitions in Chapter XI of Psychological Types.
In philosophical terminology, abstraction is the thought process wherein ideas are distanced from objects. Abstraction uses a strategy of simplification, wherein formerly concrete details are left ambiguous, vague, or undefined; thus effective communication about things in the abstract requires an intuitive or common experience between the communicator and the communication recipient. This is true for all verbal/abstract communication. Abstraction in philosophy is the process (or, to some, the alleged process) in concept-formation of recognizing some set of common features in individuals, and on that basis forming a concept of that feature. The notion of abstraction is important to understanding some philosophical controversies surrounding empiricism and the problem of universals. It has also recently become popular in formal logic under predicate abstraction. Another philosophical tool for discussion of abstraction is thought space.
* Arguing Semantics: The indication is that the speaker has now left the debate of conceptual value to talk about issues that purely concern the language. One is, accordingly, just perhaps “splitting hairs,” but not actually getting to the core concerns at issue. To be sure, semantics refers to the meaning of a sentence and, even more precisely, to the truth-values that those sentences can have. No accusation of “arguing semantics,” being carried out on misunderstood premises, should carry any of the wait that it does. Given that it does, however, carry performative weight in a conversation, the accusation of “arguing semantics” allows one interlocutor to exercise undue influence and power over another based upon a bad assumption that both accept.
** Semantics: n. 1. The branch of linguistics that deals wit the study of meaning, changes in meaning, and the principles that govern the relationship between sentences or words and their meanings.
2. The Study of the relationships between signs and symbols and what they represent.
3. Logic
a. The study of interpretations of a formal theory.
b. The study of the relationship between the structure of a theory and its subject matter.
c. (of a formal theory) the principles that determine the truth or falsehood of sentences within the theory, and the references of its terms.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition 2009 © Williams Collins Sons & Co. ltd. 1997, 1986 HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009


Ad Maiorem Dei Gloriam
Jesuit Term; Society of Jesus Motto; Latin:
“For the greater glory of God.”
Often abbreviated AMDG, the term is attributed to Saint Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuit Order.


Ad Rosam Per Crucem, Ad Crucem Per Rosam
Rosicrucian Term; Rosicrucian Motto; Latin:
“To the Rose by means of the Cross & to the Cross by the Rose.”
First written in the 1600’s in Germany and attributed to the semi-mythological founder of Rosicrucianism, Christian Rosenkreuz are the words, ‘Ad rosam per Crucem; Ad Crucem per Rosam. In eaeis gemmatus, resurgam. Non Nobis, Non Nobis, Domine. Sed nominis tui gloriae solae.’ OR ‘Attaining the Rose through the way of the Cross; Attaining the Cross through the way of the Rose. In this way, adorned, I shall be resurrected. Not for us, Nor for us, Oh! Lord, but for the sole glory of Thy name.’


Algorithm
al·go·rithm (al'gə rith´əm) n. 1 Math. a) any systematic method of solving a certain kind of problem b) the repetitive calculations used in finding the greatest common divisor of two numbers (called in full Euclidean algorithm)

2 Comput. a predetermined set of instructions for solving a specific problem in a limited number of steps


Alien
alien (āl´yən, āl´ē ən) adj. 1 belonging to another country or people; foreign

2 strange; not natural [cruel words alien to his lips]

3 opposed or repugnant [beliefs alien to one’s religion]

4 of aliens

–n. 1 a foreigner
2 a foreign-born resident in a country who has not become a naturalized citizen

3 an outsider

4 in science fiction, a being in or from outer space & not native to the Earth; extraterrestrial –vt.
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


ANNUIT COEPTIS
U.S. Dollar; Latin:
“God has favored our undertaking.’
Commissioned in 1782 by Sam Adams, artist William Barton of Philadelphia presented his submission for the United States National Seal. His design was used with minor alterations made by Charles Thompson who replaced Barton’s original Latin phrases; ‘Deo Favente’ meaning ‘With God favoring’, & ‘Perennis’ meaning ‘Everlasting’ with the now familiar phrases; ‘ANNUIT COEPTIS’ & ‘NOVUS ORDO SECLORUM’. It was then added to the design of the United States Dollar in 1935.


Bilderberg
Bilderberg takes its name from the hotel in Holland, where the first meeting took place in May 1954. That pioneering meeting grew out of the concern expressed by leading citizens on both sides of the Atlantic that Western Europe and North America were not working together as closely as they should on common problems of critical importance. It was felt that regular, off-the-record discussions would help create a better understanding of the complex forces and major trends affecting Western nations in the difficult post-war period. The Cold War has now ended. But in practically all respects there are more, not fewer, common problems - from trade to jobs, from monetary policy to investment, from ecological challenges to the task of promoting international security. It is hard to think of any major issue in either Europe or North America whose unilateral solution would not have repercussions for the other. Thus the concept of a European-American forum has not been overtaken by time. The dialogue between these two regions is still - even increasingly - critical.
Bilderberg Meetings Official Website; www.bilderbergmeetings.org


Bohemian Grove
38.468091°N 123.002671°W
“Weaving Spiders Come Not Here”
Mascot: 40FT. hollow statue of an owl. Made of concrete over steel supports. (1920’s)
Patron Saint: John of Nepomuk
Master Ceremony: The Cremation of Care; by Joseph Redding
Founded in 1872 by Henry "Harry" Edwards; the Grove is a 2,700 acre campground located at 20601 Bohemian Avenue, in Monte Rio, California. ‘Bohemian Club’ meets annually for three weeks, every mid-July.


Combatant Status
§ 948a. Definitions
‘‘In this chapter:
‘‘(1) UNLAWFUL ENEMY COMBATANT.—(A) The term ‘unlawful enemy combatant’ means—
‘‘(i) a person who has engaged in hostilities or who has purposefully and materially supported hostilities against the United States or its co-belligerents who is not a lawful enemy combatant (including a person who is part of the Taliban, al Qaeda, or associated forces); or
‘‘(ii) a person who, before, on, or after the date of the enactment of the Military Commissions Act of 2006, has been determined to be an unlawful enemy combatant by a Combatant Status Review Tribunal or another competent tribunal established under the authority of the President or the Secretary of Defense.
‘‘(B) CO-BELLIGERENT.—In this paragraph, the term ‘cobelligerent’, with respect to the United States, means any State or armed force joining and directly engaged with the United States in hostilities or directly supporting hostilities against a common enemy.
‘‘(2) LAWFUL ENEMY COMBATANT.—The term ‘lawful enemy combatant’ means a person who is—
‘‘(A) a member of the regular forces of a State party engaged in hostilities against the United States;
‘‘(B) a member of a militia, volunteer corps, or organized resistance movement belonging to a State party engaged in such hostilities, which are under responsible command, wear a fixed distinctive sign recognizable at a distance, carry their arms openly, and abide by the law of war; or
‘‘(C) a member of a regular armed force who professes allegiance to a government engaged in such hostilities, but not recognized by the United States.
‘‘(3) ALIEN.—The term ‘alien’ means a person who is not a citizen of the United States.
§ 948b. Military commissions generally
‘‘(g) GENEVA CONVENTIONS NOT ESTABLISHING SOURCE OF RIGHTS.—No alien unlawful enemy combatant subject to trial by military commission under this chapter may invoke the Geneva Conventions as a source of rights.
§ 948d. Jurisdiction of military commissions
‘‘(c) DETERMINATION OF UNLAWFUL ENEMY COMBATANT STATUS DISPOSITIVE.—A finding, whether before, on, or after the date of the enactment of the Military Commissions Act of 2006, by a Combatant Status Review Tribunal or another competent tribunal established under the authority of the President or the Secretary of Defense that a person is an unlawful enemy combatant is dispositive for purposes of jurisdiction for trial by military commission under this chapter.
§ 949u. Execution of confinement
‘‘(a) IN GENERAL.—Under such regulations as the Secretary of Defense may prescribe, a sentence of confinement adjudged by a military commission under this chapter may be carried into execution by confinement—
‘‘(1) in any place of confinement under the control of any of the armed forces; or
‘‘(2) in any penal or correctional institution under the control of the United States or its allies, or which the United States may be allowed to use.
§ 950v. Crimes triable by military commissions
‘‘(b) OFFENSES.—The following offenses shall be triable by military commission under this chapter at any time without limitation:
‘‘(1) MURDER OF PROTECTED PERSONS.
‘‘(2) ATTACKING CIVILIANS.
‘‘(3) ATTACKING CIVILIAN OBJECTS.
‘‘(4) ATTACKING PROTECTED PROPERTY.
‘‘(5) PILLAGING.
‘‘(6) DENYING QUARTER.
‘‘(7) TAKING HOSTAGES.
‘‘(8) EMPLOYING POISON OR SIMILAR WEAPONS.
‘‘(9) USING PROTECTED PERSONS AS A SHIELD.
‘‘(10) USING PROTECTED PROPERTY AS A SHIELD.
‘‘(11) TORTURE.
‘‘(12) CRUEL OR INHUMAN TREATMENT.
‘‘(13) INTENTIONALLY CAUSING SERIOUS BODILY INJURY.
‘‘(14) MUTILATING OR MAIMING.
‘‘(15) MURDER IN VIOLATION OF THE LAW OF WAR.
‘‘(16) DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY IN VIOLATION OF THE LAW OF WAR.
‘‘(17) USING TREACHERY OR PERFIDY.
‘‘(18) IMPROPERLY USING A FLAG OF TRUCE.
‘‘(19) IMPROPERLY USING A DISTINCTIVE EMBLEM.
‘‘(20) INTENTIONALLY MISTREATING A DEAD BODY.
‘‘(21) RAPE.
‘‘(22) SEXUAL ASSAULT OR ABUSE.
‘‘(23) HIJACKING OR HAZARDING A VESSEL OR AIRCRAFT.
‘‘(24) TERRORISM.—Any person subject to this chapter who intentionally kills or inflicts great bodily harm on one or more protected persons, or intentionally engages in an act that evinces a wanton disregard for human life, in a manner calculated to influence or affect the conduct of government or civilian population by intimidation or coercion, or to retaliate against government conduct, shall be punished, if death results to one or more of the victims, by death or such other punishment as a military commission under this chapter may direct, and, if death does not result to any of the victims, by such punishment, other than death, as a military commission under this chapter may direct.
‘‘(25) PROVIDING MATERIAL SUPPORT FOR TERRORISM.
‘‘(26) WRONGFULLY AIDING THE ENEMY.
‘‘(27) SPYING.
‘‘(28) CONSPIRACY.—Any person subject to this chapter who conspires to commit one or more substantive offenses triable by military commission under this chapter, and who knowingly does any overt act to effect the object of the conspiracy, shall be punished, if death results to one or more of the victims, by death or such other punishment as a military commission under this chapter may direct, and, if death does not result to any of the victims, by such punishment, other than death, as a military commission under this chapter may direct.
S.3930 Military Commissions Act of 2006 – 109th Congress; January 3rd, 2006 - PUBLIC LAW 109–366—OCT. 17, 2006.


Conspiracy
con·spira·cy (kən spir'ə sē) n. 1 a planning & acting together secretly, esp. for an unlawful or harmful purpose, such as murder or treason

2 the plan agreed on, plot

3 the group taking part in such a plan

4 a combining or working together [the conspiracy of events] –SYN. PLOT
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


“Cui Bono?”
Cui bono? [Latin] For whose advantage?; Who benefits? - The exclamation may be used to ask who benefited from the results of a crime, usu. to cast suspicion without offering evidence of guilt. Despite the literal meaning, the term is more often used to mean "what's the good of it?" or "what benefits are there?"
Black’s Law Dictionary, 9th Edition; COPYRIGHT © 1891.1910.1933.1951.1957.1968.1979.1990 WEST PUBUSHING CO.
Cf. “Follow the money.”


Decriminalization Vs. Legalization
Decriminalization:
A system that punishes offenses by means other than prison. Fines for most traffic violations are an example. In relation to drugs, it is normally limited to possession (and sometimes growth) of small amounts (often around one ounce) and sometimes to sale of equally small amounts to adults. It is also often limited to marijuana among the illegal drugs. There is another distinction possible between de jure decriminalization, which entails an amendment to criminal legislation, and de facto decriminalization, which involves an administrative decision not to prosecute acts that nonetheless remain subject to arrest and imprisonment under the law. Some cities have simply decided de facto to specify that enforcement of some marijuana laws is the "lowest priority" for their police forces.
Drug Policy forum of Texas; DPFT www.dpft.org
decriminalization, n. (1945) The legislative act or process oflegalizing an illegal act <many doctors seek the decriminalization of euthanasia>.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 9th Edition; COPYRIGHT © 1891.1910.1933.1951.1957.1968.1979.1990 WEST PUBUSHING CO. 

Legalization:
A system that allows the use and sale of drugs to adults under a system of regulation such as pertains to alcohol or perhaps involving licenses. Many suggest there would be a ban on advertising and public use. If the alcohol model prevailed, different states might vary the regulatory structure and legality might also be limited by local option to specific areas within a state.
Drug Policy forum of Texas; DPFT www.dpft.org
legalize, vb. (18c) 1. To make lawful; to authorize or justify by legal sanction <the bill to legalize marijuana never made it to the Senate floor>.

2. To imbue with the spirit of the law; to make legalistic <as religions age, they tend to become legalized>. -legalization, n.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 9th Edition; COPYRIGHT © 1891.1910.1933.1951.1957.1968.1979.1990 WEST PUBUSHING CO.


Delphi Method
RAND developed the Delphi method in the 1950s, originally to forecast the impact of technology on warfare. The method entails a group of experts who anonymously reply to questionnaires and subsequently receive feedback in the form of a statistical representation of the "group response," after which the process repeats itself. The goal is to reduce the range of responses and arrive at something closer to expert consensus. The Delphi Method has been widely adopted and is still in use today.
RAND Corporation; ‘Objective Analysis. Effective Solutions.’ – www.rand.org
Cf. Expertlens


Deus Meumque Jus
Masonic Term; 33° Motto, Ancient & Accepted rite, 1855; Latin:
“God & My Right.”
Lexicon of Freemasonry; Albert G. Mackey, M.D. 33° –Copyright © T.A. McClure Publishing Co. 1908, 1909, 1910, 1915
Cf. ‘Dieu et mon droit’; the motto of the British Monarch in England, A. & A.S.R.S.J..


Disciple
dis·ci·ple (di sī´pəl) n. 1 a pupil or follower of any teacher or school of religion, learning, art, etc.

2 an early follower of Jesus, esp. one of the Apostles –SYN. FOLLOWER
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


Domestic Terrorist
SEC. 802. DEFINITION OF DOMESTIC TERRORISM.
(a) DOMESTIC TERRORISM DEFINED.—Section 2331 of title 18, United States Code, is amended—
(1) in paragraph (1)(B)(iii), by striking ‘‘by assassination or kidnapping’’ and inserting ‘‘by mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping’’;
(2) in paragraph (3), by striking ‘‘and’’;
(3) in paragraph (4), by striking the period at the end and inserting ‘‘; and’’; and
(4) by adding at the end the following:
‘‘(5) the term ‘domestic terrorism’ means activities that—
‘‘(A) involve acts dangerous to human life that are a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or of any State;
‘‘(B) appear to be intended—
‘‘(i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population;
‘‘(ii) to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or coercion; or
‘‘(iii) to affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping; and
‘‘(C) occur primarily within the territorial jurisdiction of the United States.’’.
(b) CONFORMING AMENDMENT.—Section 3077(1) of title 18, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:
‘‘(1) ‘act of terrorism’ means an act of domestic or international terrorism as defined in section 2331;’’.
USA PATRIOT ACT OF 2001, PUBLIC LAW 107–56—OCT. 26, 2001 ; SEC. 802. DEFINITION OF DOMESTIC TERRORISM


E Pluribus Unum
U.S. Motto; Latin:
“Out of Many, One.”
Motto of the United States of America in 1782, through Act of Congress; until 1956 when they passed H.J. Resolution 396 adopting ‘In God We Trust’ as the official U.S. motto.


Freudian Slip
Freudian Slip a mistake made in speaking by which, it is thought, the speaker inadvertently reveals unconscious motives, desires, etc.
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


Georgia Guidestones
34.231984°N 82.894506°W
Elbert County, Georgia, USA
+Erected by the Elberton Granite Finishing Company in 1979-80 under the commission of R.C. Christian.
Astronomical Features: The four outer stones are oriented to mark the limits of the 18.6 year lunar declination cycle. The center column features a hole through which the North Star can be seen regardless of time, as well as a slot that is aligned with the Sun's solstices and equinoxes. A 7/8" aperture in the capstone allows a ray of sun to pass through at noon each day, shining a beam on the center stone indicating the day of the year.
Languages Used: Babylonian, Classical Greek, Sanskrit, & Egyptian Hieroglyphs; Top
English, Spanish, Swahili, Hindi, Hebrew, Arabic, Chinese, & Russian; Main Slabs
“Let these be Guidestones to an Age of Reason.”
1. Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature.
2. Guide reproduction wisely — improving fitness and diversity.
3. Unite humanity with a living new language.
4. Rule passion — faith — tradition — and all things with tempered reason.
5. Protect people and nations with fair laws and just courts.
6. Let all nations rule internally resolving external disputes in a world court.
7. Avoid petty laws and useless officials.
8. Balance personal rights with social duties.
9. Prize truth — beauty — love — seeking harmony with the infinite.
10. Be not a cancer on the earth — Leave room for nature — Leave room for nature.


Governmental Rule
“The current political system coming into dominating control of the ‘New World Order’ is Oligarchs ruling through Technocracy, a ‘Technocratic-Oligarchy’ if you will.”
gov·ern·ment (guv'ərn mənt) n. 1 a) the exercise of authority over a state, district, organization, institution, etc.; direction; control; rule; management b) the right, function, or power of governing

2 a) a system of ruling, controlling, etc. b) an established system of political administration by which a nation, state, district, etc. is governed [we need honest government] c) the study of such systems; political science

3 all the people or agencies that administer or control the affairs of a nation, state, institution, etc.; administration [the election resulted in a new government]

4 [often G-] the executive or administrative branch of government of a particular nation as constituted by the political party or coalition in power [a Labor government in Great Britain]

5 [Now Rare] a governed territory 6 Gram. the influence of one word over the case mood of another adj. of or relating to government
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio
government. (l4c) l. The structure of principles and rules determining how a state or organization is regulated.

2. The sovereign power in a nation or state.

3. An organization through which a body of people exercises political authority; the machinery by which sovereign power is expressed <the Canadian
government>.• In this sense, the term refers collectively to the political organs of a country regardless of their function or level, and regardless of the subject matter they deal with. Cf. NATION; STATE.
central government. See federal government (1).
de facto government (di fak-toh). 1. A government that has taken over the regular government and exercises sovereignty over a nation.

2. An independent government established and exercised by a group of a country's inhabitants who have separated themselves from the parent state. - Also termed government de facto.
de jure government. A functioning government that is legally established. - Also termed government de jure.
federal government. 1. A national government that exercises some degree of control over smaller political units that have surrendered some degree of power in exchange for the right to participate in national political matters. - Also termed (in federal states) central government.

2. The U.S. government. Also termed national government. [Cases: United States C=~ 1.]
government de facto. See de facto government.
government de jure. See de jure government.
local government. The government of a particular locality, such as a city, county, or parish; a governing body at a lower level than the state government. • The term includes a school district, fire district, transportation authority, and any other special-purpose district or authority. Also termed municipal government. [Cases: Municipal Corporations C=6.]
mixed government. A government containing a blend of forms, as in democracy and monarchy.
municipal government. See local government.
national government. 1. See NATIONAL GOVERNMENT.

2. See federal government (2).
proprietary government. Hist. A government granted by the Crown to an individual, in the nature of a feudatory principality, with powers of legislation formerly belonging to the owner of a county palatine. Cf. COUNTY PALATINE.
provisional government. A government temporarily established to govern until a permanent one is organized to replace it.
republican government. A government in the republican form; specif., a government by representatives chosen by the people. [Cases: States C::::>4.3.]
state government. The government of a state of the United States. [Cases: States C::::> 1.]
4. The executive branch of the U.S. government.

5. The prosecutors in a given criminal case <the government has objected to the introduction of that evidence>.

6. An academic course devoted to the study of government; political science <Bridges is enrolled in Government 101>.
national government. The government of an entire country, as distinguished from that of a province, state, subdivision, or territory of the country and as distinguished from an international organization. See federal government (2) under GOVERNMENT.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 9th Edition; COPYRIGHT © 1891.1910.1933.1951.1957.1968.1979.1990 WEST PUBUSHING CO.

oli·gar·chy (äl'I gär´kē) n.pl. -·chies 1 a form of government in which the ruling power belongs to a few persons

2 a state governed in this way

3 the persons ruling such a state
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio
tech·noc·racy (tek näk'rə sē) n. government by the technicians; specif,. the theory or doctrine of a proposed system of government in which all economic resources, and hence the entire social system, would be controlled by scientists and engineers
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio
Radiating metaphorical truth, it is incorrectly defined on the web as:
From the Latin gubernare, and the Greek kubernan, meaning –‘to control’
and from Latin mente, meaning ‘mind’
thus equating that Government = ‘Control of the Mind’


Hegelian Dialectic
“Problem-Reaction-Solution”; “Thesis-Antithesis-Synthesis”
“True Dialectic is not a dialogue with another person or with the subject-matter, but the intrinsic development of the subject-matter.”
The Penguin Dictionary of Philosophy – Thomas Mautner; Copyright © Thomas Mautner, 1996, 1997
He·gel (hāgəl), Ge·org Wil·helm Frie·drich (gā ðrkh' vil'helm frē' driH) 1770-1831; Ger. philosopher
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio
dia·lec·tic (dī´ə lek'tik) n. 1 [often pl.] the art or practice of examining opinions or ideas logically, often by the method of question and answer, so as to determine their validity

2 logical argumentation

3 [often pl.] a) the method of logic used by Hegel & adapted by Marx to observable social & economic processes: it is based on the principle that an idea or event (thesis) generates its opposite (antithesis), leading to a reconciliation of opposites (synthesis) b) the general application of this principle in analysis, exposition, etc. –adj. DIALECTICAL
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio
He·geli·an·ism (hi gā'lē ən -iz´əm) n. the philosophy of Hegel, who held that every existent idea or fact belongs to an all-embracing mind in which each idea or situation (thesis) evokes its opposite (antithesis) & these two result in a unified whole (synthesis), which in turn becomes a new thesis
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


Immutable
im·mu·table (i myōō t'ə bəl) adj. never changing or varying; unchangeable
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


In Deo Fiducia Vinces
Masonic Term; London Company of Masons, 1677 & Premier Grand Lodge of Freemasons, 1717; Latin:
“In the Lord is all our Trust.”
Encyclopedia of Freemasonry and Its Kindred Sciences; Albert G. Mackey M.D. 33°, 1873 volume I & 1878 volume II


IN HOC SIGNO VINCES
Masonic Term; Templar Masonry Motto, 1780; Latin:
"In this sign you shall conquer!"
The words Constantine the Great claimed to have seen in a vision before the Battle of the Milvian Bridge.
Motto of Sigma Chi fraternity, the Norwegian Army 2nd Battalion & the House of Di Santis.


Inspiration
in·spi·ra·tion (in´spə rā´shən) n. 1 a breathing in, as of air into the lungs; inhaling

2 an inspiring or being inspired mentally or emotionally

3 a) an inspiring influence; any stimulus to creative thought or action b) an inspired idea, action, etc.

4 a promoting of something to be written or said

5 Theol. a divine influence upon human beings, as that resulting in the writing of the Scriptures
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


Interpretation
in·ter·pre·ta·tion (in tʉ'prə tāshən) n. 1 the act or result of interpreting; explanation, meaning, translation, exposition, etc.

2 the expression of a person’s conception of a work of art, subject, etc. through acting, playing, writing, criticizing, etc. [the pianist’s interpretation of the sonata]
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


Investigate
in·ves·ti·gate (in ves'tə gāt´) vt. to search into so as to learn the facts; inquire into systematically –vi. To make an investigation
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


Lux e Tenebris
Masonic Term; Scottish Rite Motto, 1802; Latin:
“Light out of Darkness.”
A Masonic motto, expressive of the object of masonry, & of what the true Mason supposes himself to have attained.
Lexicon of Freemasonry; Albert G. Mackey, M.D. 33° –Copyright © T.A. McClure Publishing Co. 1908, 1909, 1910, 1915
Motto of the 67th Network Warfare Wing; U.S.A.F.


Non Nobis Domine, Sed Nomini Tuo Da Gloriam
Latin Hym & Templar Term; Psalm 115:1 KJV, Latin:
“Not to us, not to us, O’ Lord, but to your name give glory.”


Novus Ordo Seclorum
U.S. Dollar; Latin:
“New Secular Order”
Part of the U.S. National Seal commissioned in 1782 & placed on the U.S. Dollar bill in 1935. The phrase is also apart of the coat of arms for the Yale School of Management, Yale University’s business school.

Taken from the fourth Eclogue of Virgil which reads, ‘Now comes the final era of the Sibyl’s song; The great order of the ages is born afresh. And now justice returns, honored rules return; now a new lineage is sent down from high heaven.’
Cf. ‘Novus Ordo Mundi’, New World Order


Omnipotent
om·nipo·tent (äm nip'ə tənt) adj. having unlimited power or authority; all-powerful –the Omnipotent God

Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


Omnipresent
omni·pres·ent (äm´ni prez'ənt) adj. present in all places at the same time
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


Omniscient
om·nis·cient (äm nish'ənt) adj. having infinite knowledge; knowing all things –the Omniscient God
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


Ordo Ab Chao
Masonic Term; 33° Motto, Ancient Craft, 1395; Latin:
“Order out of Chaos.”
Lexicon of Freemasonry; Albert G. Mackey, M.D. 33° –Copyright © T.A. McClure Publishing Co. 1908, 1909, 1910, 1915


Organism
or·gan·ism (ôr´gə niz'əm) n. 1 any individual animal, plant, bacterium, etc. having various parts or systems that function together as a whole to maintain life & its activities

2 anything resembling a living thing in its complexity of structure or functions
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 200-2 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


Orwellian
Descriptive of the world envisioned by the late George Orwell (June 25, 1903-Jan. 21, 1950) & written about in both his dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949) & his allegorical novella Animal Farm (1945), ‘Orwellian Police-State Behaviors’ include:
· Invasion of, then loss of personal privacy, either directly physically or indirectly by surveillance.
· State Control of the Citizens Daily Life – ‘Big Brother’, snitch society.
· Official Federal, State, and Local encouragement of policies contributing to the socio-economic disintegration of the family unit & independent living.
· Submissive-Worship of Leadership.
· Saturation of ‘Doublethink’, ‘Doublespeak’, & ‘Newspeak’; perpetuated through the Delphi Method and the Hegelian Dialectic.
· The Revision of History in favor of the State.
· The use of euphemisms to describe an agency of the State indicative of the Orwellian Speech already established; e.g. calling the department that wages war for the State the ‘Ministry of Defense’ OR the ‘Ministry of Peace’.


Person
person. (13c) 1. A human being. Also termed natural person.
private person. 1. A person who does not hold public office or serve in the military.

2. Civil law. An entity such as a corporation or partnership that is governed by private law.
protected person. 1. A person for whom a conservator has been appointed or other protective order has been made. [Cases: Guardian and Ward 9.5, 17; Mental Health 104.]

2. Int'l law. A person who is protected by a rule of international law; esp., one who is in the hands of an occupying force during a conflict. • Protected persons are entitled to a standard of treatment (including a prohibition on coercion and corporal punishment) under the Geneva Convention Relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War (1949).

3. English law. An inhabitant of a protectorate of the United Kingdom .• Though not a British subject, such a person is given diplomatic protection by the Crown.
2. The living body of a human being <contraband found on the smuggler's person>.

3. An entity (such as a corporation) that is recognized by law as having most of the rights and duties of a human being.• In this sense, the term includes partnerships and other associations, whether incorporated or unincorporated. "So far as legal theory is concerned, a person is any being whom the law regards as capable of rights and duties. Any being that is so capable is a person, whether a human being or not, and no being that is not so capable is a person, even though he be a man. Persons are the substances of which rights and duties are the attributes. It is only in this respect that persons possess juridical significance, and this is the exclusive point of view from which personality receives legal recognition."

John Salmond, Jurisprudence 318 (Glanville L Williams ed., 10th ed. 1947).
artificial person. (17c) An entity, such as a corporation, created by law and given certain legal rights and duties of a human being; a being, real or imaginary, who for the purpose of legal reasoning is treated more or less as a human being .• An entity is a person for purposes of the Due Process and Equal Protection Clauses but is not a citizen for purposes of the Privileges and Immunities Clauses in Article IV § 2 and in the Fourteenth Amendment - Also termed fictitious person; juristic person; juridical person; legal person; moral person. Cf. LEGAL ENTITY. [Cases: Corporations (::::;> 1.1 (2).]
Black’s Law Dictionary, 9th Edition; COPYRIGHT © 1891.1910.1933.1951.1957.1968.1979.1990 WEST PUBUSHING CO.


Schedules of Controlled Substances
§ 812. Schedules of controlled substances
(a) Establishment
There are established five schedules of controlled substances, to be known as schedules I, II, III, IV, and V.
Such schedules shall initially consist of the substances listed in this section. The schedules established by this section shall be updated and republished on a semiannual basis during the two-year period beginning one year after October 27, 1970, and shall be updated and republished on an annual basis thereafter.
(b) Placement on schedules; findings required Except where control is required by United States obligations under an international treaty, convention, or protocol, in effect on October 27, 1970, and except in the case of an immediate precursor, a drug or other substance may not be placed in any schedule unless the findings required for such schedule are made with respect to such drug or other substance. The findings required for each of the schedules are as follows:
(1) Schedule I.—
(A) The drug or other substance has a high potential for abuse.
(B) The drug or other substance has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States.
(C) There is a lack of accepted safety for use of the drug or other substance under medical supervision.
(2) Schedule II.—
(A) The drug or other substance has a high potential for abuse.
(B) The drug or other substance has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States or a currently accepted medical use with severe restrictions.
(C) Abuse of the drug or other substances may lead to severe psychological or physical dependence.
(3) Schedule III.—
(A) The drug or other substance has a potential for abuse less than the drugs or other substances in schedules I and II.
(B) The drug or other substance has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States.
(C) Abuse of the drug or other substance may lead to moderate or low physical dependence or high psychological dependence.
(4) Schedule IV.—
(A) The drug or other substance has a low potential for abuse relative to the drugs or other substances in schedule III.
(B) The drug or other substance has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States.
(C) Abuse of the drug or other substance may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence relative to the drugs or other substances in schedule III.
(5) Schedule V.—
(A) The drug or other substance has a low potential for abuse relative to the drugs or other substances in schedule IV.
(B) The drug or other substance has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States.
(C) Abuse of the drug or other substance may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence relative to the drugs or other substances in schedule IV.
Title 21 – Food & Drugs; Chapter 13 – Abuse Prevention & Control; Subchapter I – Control & Enforcement; Part B – Authority To Control; Standards & Schedules ~ § 812. Schedules of Controlled Substances (21 USC 812) Jan. 3, 2007


Scientific Method
scientific method a method of research in which a hypothesis is tested by means of a carefully documented control experiment that can be repeated by any other researcher
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio
scientific method. An analytical technique by which a hypothesis is formulated and then systematically tested through observation and experimentation.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 9th Edition; COPYRIGHT © 1891.1910.1933.1951.1957.1968.1979.1990 WEST PUBUSHING CO.


Theory
theo·ry (thē'ə rē, thir'ē) n. 1 [Obs.] a mental viewing; contemplation

2 a speculative idea or plan as to how something might be done

3 a systematic statement of principles involved [the theory of equations in mathematics]

4 a formulation of apparent relationships or underlying principles of certain observed phenomena which has been verified to some degree

5 that branch of an art or science consisting in a knowledge of its principles & methods rather than in its practice; pure, as opposed to applied, science, etc.
6 popularly, a mere conjecture, or guess
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


Timeless
time·less (tīm'lis) adj. 1 that cannot be measured by time; unending

2 transcending time; eternal

3 restricted to no specific time; always valid, true, or applicable

4 [Obs.] untimely
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


Translate
trans·late (trans´lāt', tranz´-; trans lāt´, tranz-) vt. -·lat´ed, -·lat´ing 1 to move from one place or condition to another; transfer; specif., a) Theol. to convey directly to heaven without death b) Eccles. To transfer (a bishop) from one see to another; also, to move (a saint’s body or remains) from one place of interment to another

2 to put into the words of a different language

3 to change into another medium or form [to translate ideas into action]

4 to put into different words; rephrase or paraphrase in explanation

5 to transmit (a telegraphic message) again by means of an automatic relay

6 [Archaic] to enrapture; entrance

7 Cytology to convert into a chain of amino acids forming a specific protein: said of genetic information in the form of messenger RNA 8 Mech. to impart translation to

–vi. 1 to make a translation to another language

2 to be capable of being translated –trans·lat´·able adj.
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


Transliterate
trans·lit·er·ate (trans lit´ə āt´, tranz-) vt. -·at´ed, -·at´ing to write or spell (words, letters, etc.) in corresponding characters of another alphabet
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


Trinity
Christian Term;
The Doctrinal formalization of the Biblical data on the Trinity is satisfactorily worded in the Westminster Shorter Catechism:

“There are three persons in the Godhead, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost; and these three are one God, the same in substance, equal in power and glory.” The data of revelation then, established in the minds of N.T. Christians four convictions: 1. God is One 2. Jesus is God 3. The Holy Spirit is God. 4. The Three Persons are Subject and Object, ‘I and thou’, each to the others.
Zondervan’s Compact Bible Dictionary, T. Alton Bryant; © Zondervan Publishing 2001
Water is often used to describe the Trinity. ‘Water’ being the object and liquid, gas, and solid being its forms, or the “personifications” of the water. I have always however, preferred the symbolism of the egg. The ‘Egg’ being the object and the yoke, white, and shell being its forms; all one egg, but three very distinct and separately individual ‘representations’ of the same egg. In these past few years I have come to an even deeper understanding of this principle however, and I’ve yet to see it spoken of elsewhere…the fourth aspect of the ‘trinity’. Let me use the egg to explain this principle. As discussed earlier; the yoke, white, and shell are all three separate parts of the same egg. While separated they all take on their own, individual being…but never cease in being part of the same original egg. Three parts; one whole. This principle of the trinity is shared almost universally. What is neglected in this very well thought symbolism however, is the fact that it forgets one of the eggs most essential features….the chicken that comes forth. Yoke+White+Shell=Egg=’s Chicken, i.e.
Father+Son+Spirit= “Triune Godhead” The three are God, and he is Elôhîym.


Truth
Truth (trōō th) n. 1 the quality or state of being true; specif., a) [Obs.] loyalty; trustworthiness b) sincerity; genuineness; honesty c) the quality of being in accordance with fact d) reality; actual existence e) agreement with a standard, rule, etc.

4 a particular belief or teaching regarded by the speaker as the true one: often with the –in truth truly; in fact –of a truth certainly
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio


U.F.O.
UFO (yōō´ ef´ō') n. [[u(nidentified) f(lying) o(bject)]] 1 any of a number of unidentified objects or phenomena frequently reported, esp. since 1947, to have been observed or tracked in the sky & variously explained as being atmospheric phenomena, hallucinations, misperceptions of actual objects, alien spacecraft, etc.

2 a spacecraft from another planet; flying saucer
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio
Cf. U.S.O.; Unidentified Submersible Objects


United States ‘Executive Order’
Definition and Authority
The Constitution does not contain any provisions that define executive orders or proclamations. The most widely accepted description appears to be that of the House Government Operations Committee in 1957:
Executive orders and proclamations are directives or actions by the President. When they are founded on the authority of the President derived from the Constitution or statute, they may have the force and effect of law.... In the narrower sense Executive orders and proclamations are written documents denominated as such.... Executive orders are generally directed to, and govern actions by, Government officials and agencies. They usually affect private individuals only indirectly. Proclamations in most instances affect primarily the activities of private individuals. Since the President has no power or authority over individual citizens and their rights except where he is granted such power and authority by a provision in the Constitution or by statute, the President’s proclamations are not legally binding and are at best hortatory unless based on such grants of authority. The difference between Executive orders and proclamations is more one of form than of substance.1
1 Staff of House Comm. on Government Operations, 85th Cong., 1st Sess., Executive Orders and Proclamations: A Study of a Use of Presidential Powers (Comm. Print 1957) [hereinafter Orders and Proclamations].
‘Executive Orders: Issuance and Revocation’ Congressional Research Service, March 25, 2010 - Vanessa K. Burrows; Legislative Attorney 7-5700 www.crs.gov RS20846
Executive Order. Written documents signed by the President that have the effect of law, without the enforcement of penalties associated with regulations passed by Congress.
U.S. Department of Defense; Defense Security Service – Terms & Definitions www.dss.mil


Wealth
wealth (welth) n. 1 a) much money or property; great amount of worldly possessions; riches b) the state of having much money or property; affluence [a person of wealth]

2 a large amount (of something);
abundance [a wealth of ideas]

3 valuable products, contents, or derivatives [the wealth of the oceans]

4 [Obs.] weal; well-being

5 Econ. a) everything having economic value measurable in price b) any useful material thing capable of being bought, sold, or stocked for future disposition
Webster’s New World™ College Dictionary – Fourth Edition; Copyright © 2002 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio
wealth. 1. A large quantity of something.

2. The state of having abundant financial resources; affluence.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 9th Edition; COPYRIGHT © 1891.1910.1933.1951.1957.1968.1979.1990 WEST PUBUSHING CO.


God (430): 'Elôhîym
Gen. 1:1
This masculine noun is plural in form. Some scholars regard 'Elôhîym as a derivative of ‘Elōah (433) while others reverse the connection. 'Elôhîym is the most common Hebrew word translated “God” in the O.T.
LORD (3068): Yahweh
Gen. 2:4
The covenant name of God most prominently known in connection with His relationship with the nation of Israel; also known as the Tetragrammaton.
G-OD/od(410): 'El
Gen. 14:18
This masculine noun emphasizes might; hence, it is used of men, angels, pagan gods or idols, mighty natural objects, God, especially as modified by such attributes as holy, compassionate, jealous, living, and great.
Lord (136) GOD (3069): 'Adhōnāy Yahweh
Gen. 15:2
This plural noun is a form of ‘ādhōn (113). Like the plural from 'Elôhîym (430). 3069 Used after 136, and pronounced by Jews as 430, in order to prevent the repetition of the same sound, since they elsewhere pronounced 3068 as 136. God.
“Depending on the Bible you use, 'El can be translated as GOD or God.”
*Numbers in parenthesis references to Strong’s Concordance.
**Dr. Spiros Zodhiates


Masonic Calendar System
Symbolic or Ancient Craft
Ancient Craft Masons commence their Era with the Creation of the World, calling it Anno Lucis (A.L.) "in the Year of the Light," adding 4000 to the common calendar. Thus, A.D. 2001 equals A.L. 6001.

Symbolic Lodges hold Communications.
Capitular
Royal Arch Masons date from the year of the commencement of the building of the second temple by Zerubbabel, calling it Anno Inventionis(A.I.) "in the Year of the Discovery," adding 530 to the common calendar. Thus, A.D. 2001 equals A.I. 2531.

Royal Arch chapters hold Convocations.
Cryptic
Cryptic Masons date from the year in which the Temple of Solomon was completed, calling it Anno Depositionis (A.Dep.) "in the Year of the Deposit," adding 1000 to the common calendar. Thus, A.D. 2001 is equivalent to A.Dep. 3001.

Cryptic Councils hold Assemblies.
Chivalric or Templary
Knights Templar commence their Era with the organization of their Order, calling it Anno Ordinis (A.O.) "in the Year of the Order," subtracting 1118 from the common calendar. Thus, A.D. 2001 is the same as A.O. 883.

Commanderies of Knights Templar hold Conclaves.
Order of High Priesthood
Anointed High Priests date from the year of the blessin of Abraham by the High Priest, Melchizedek, King of Salem, calling it Anno Benedictions (A.B. or A.Beo.) "in the Year of Blessing," adding 1913 to the common calendar. Thus, A.D. 2001 equals A.B. 3914.

Councils of Anointed Priests hold Conventions.
Scottish Rite
The Scottish Rite dates as do Ancient Craft Masons exept that they use the Jewish chronology, calling it Anno Mundi (A.M.) "in the Year of the World," adding 3760 to the common calendar. Thus, A.D. 2001 equals A.M. 5761.

Scottish Rite Consistories hold Reunions or Rendezvous.
Shrinedom
Temples of the Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine mark time by cycles. Each 30 years from the Hegira of July 15, A.D. 622 constitutes a cycle, in which 19 of the years contain 355 days and 11 years contain 356 days.
Shrine Temples hold Sessions.


Communism
Any economic theory or system based on the ownership of all property by the community as a whole.


Democracy
Government in which the people hold the ruling power either directly or through elected representatives; rule by the ruled.


Fascism
A system of government characterized by rigid one-party dictatorship, forcible suppression of opposition, private economic enterprise under centralized governmental control, belligerent nationalism, racism, and militarism, etc.


Marxism
The system of thought developed by Karl Marx, his co-worker Friedrich Engels, and their followers: see socialism, communism, and dialectical materialism.


Monarchy
A government or state headed by a monarch: called absolute when there is no limitation on the monarch's power, constitutional when there is such limitation.


Oligarchy
A form of government in which the ruling power belongs to a few persons.


Republic
A State or nation in which the supreme power rests in all the citizens entitled to vote (the electorate) and is exercised by representatives elected, directly or indirectly, by them and responsible to them.


Socialism
Any of various theories or systems of the ownership and operation of the means of production and distribution by society or the community rather than by private individuals, with all members of society or the community sharing in the work and the products.

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